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  1. No photos have been posted for a while so here goes. About every year my wife and I drive on a long gravel road that winds it's way for a mile or two through pasture fields and it dead ends at a little church where some of her relatives are buried. Hardly ever see a car on that road so we can just creep along and enjoy the beautiful scenery. We go so slow you could almost walk along beside the car. We took these photos at the end of last summer. We usually park behind the church near the graveyard and just stand there and take in the view. One of the most peaceful places I know of.
    9 points
  2. My daughter fusses at me for not recycling plastid water bottles and cardboard. She says if my generation had done more to keep the environment clean it wouldn't be in such bad shape now., implying that my generation did nothing to stop pollution of the environment Later on I found the following and emailed it to her. She hasn't mentioned recycling to me since. The older people here will understand the moral of the story. --------------------------------------------------- This Green Thing Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment, The woman apologized to the young girl and explained, "We didn't have this 'green thing' back in my earlier days." The young clerk responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations." The older lady said that she was right our generation didn't have the "green thing" in its day. The older lady went on to explain: Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled. But we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day. Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable besides household garbage bags was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But, too bad we didn't do the "green thing" back then. We walked up stairs because we didn't have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the "green thing" in our day. Back then we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts. Wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day. Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she's right; we didn't have the "green thing" back then. We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blade in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the "green thing" back then. Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service in the family's $45,000 SUV or van, which cost what a whole house did before the "green thing." We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint. But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn't have the "green thing" back then? Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation.
    7 points
  3. Stopped in at a little car show in New Mexico today
    7 points
  4. 15 Reattas altogether, which really turned some heads. My car was the only ‘88 and got a lot of attention as I had left the windows down so people could poke their heads in to marvel at the touchscreen setup.
    7 points
  5. Here is my triple Blue 89' Sapphire Firemist
    7 points
  6. My problem has been solved thanks to Rogold's suggestion. Bear with me for the following explanation. The photo in the previous post showed the brake reservoir after I pumped the brakes 25 times with the key on and engine running. That photo shows the fluid level right on the full mark. Following Ronnie's comments, I again pumped the brakes 25 times with the key off. The fluid level rose to the top of the reservoir. I did the pumping method 2 or 3 times since the recent repair, and each time I evacuated an excess amount of brake fluid from the reservoir. (I told the mechanic not to overfill and to use the pumping method - he says he followed my instructions.) However, I suctioned the excess fluid from the reservoir. The current level is as is seen in the photo below - probably in inch or so below the full mark. In the photo is also the the bottle used to contain the excess fluid - a combined 7 1/2 ounces. I suctioned 2-3 ounces of excess fluid each time I used the pumping method down to the full mark so as not to be overfilled. The other photo is looking straight down into the fluid reservoir. The circular object surrounded by a black ring apparently is the float mentioned by Rogold. I used a flashlight and a drinking straw to probe the float in an up and down motion. The probing dislodged the shiny object propped up in front of the bottle with the excess fluid contained therein. It looks like a piece of aluminum foil that covers the opening of a new can of brake fluid. Removing the aluminum foil, and starting the engine, the ABS yellow and the Red Warning light both disappeared! Problem solved! Thanks to all for your help!
    6 points
  7. July of 2022 front yard Minnesota 1990 Buick Reatta 1989 Buick Regal custom
    6 points
  8. Reatta’s @ 2022 BCA Nationals; Lisle, IL.
    6 points
  9. Just drove my newly acquired 91 very in Florida and drove home 900 miles to PA. I tried to stick to 65 given my unfamiliarity with the mechanicals but it ran flawlessly and I averaged 30 mpg!
    6 points
  10. Another Reatta sighting. I was in Oshkosh tonight having supper with my sister and Brother in Law. When I was driving out of the parking lot I had to wait for a car to turn to the lot I was in. He was eyeballing me all the way in while I kept thinking "Hurry up dummy so I can get out on the road and get home". So he gets in and I quickly pull out only to have the car coming down the road heading the same way I am be a white Reatta. He wave as he went by, I flashed my lights at him in acknowledgement. Never saw the car before but it does have one burned out bulb in the taillight. And here I thought I was the only guy driving a Reatta in Wisconsin winters...
    6 points
  11. From my grandchildren 👍
    6 points
  12. Today marks the 80th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Many of you know that my dad was a Pearl Harbor survivor, Battleship USS Oklahoma. I read in the news today that another USS Oklahoma survivor is attending the ceremony today at the USS Arizona memorial...he's 101 years old. My mother's only brother served under Patton's 3rd army and was killed in Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. While reading topics in the "other forum" I find out that Ronnie's dad also served under Patton's 3rd and was in Belgium. Let us not forget those who served our country in time of war.
    6 points
  13. My daughter took this photo while on vacation in Baltimore this past weekend. I think it is cool. When I first looked it I really thought there was a hole in the brick wall of the building but there isn't.
    6 points
  14. Two of the more interesting pics of my '91 Reatta are when I was having it repainted right after purchase in 2013:
    5 points
  15. My '89 at the Rockville Car show of 500 cars - showing off my new "Survivor Plague"
    5 points
  16. I took my vert to Tower Rock Saturday. This is on the Mississippi River near Chester, Illinois. The river is low now that people can walk out to the rock in the river bed.
    5 points
  17. It would appear that of the 82 views of this thread, we do not have an original owner of a Reatta. There were several 2nd and 3rd owners but no original owner. This is not surprising as the Reatta came out 34 years ago and was marketed at folks who had a nice disposable income which usually starts to materialize in the 45 to 60 age bracket. Nevertheless, owning a Reatta at any age is a blast !!!
    5 points
  18. I’m trying to get over my fear of the Reatta having a sudden unexpected breakdown, so I threw caution to the wind and took it on a trip up to the mountains Wednesday. 3 hours of highway driving followed by 2 hours of steep winding mountain roads and the car performed like a champ. Sitting at idle in an overlook the temp gets up to 208 and the highest it’s gotten sitting in stop and go traffic was 214. I think the factory default setting for high fan is 216 . It seems to cool back down quickly once moving along again.
    5 points
  19. It has occurred to me that I have lived through some interesting times. When was young, "What's good for GM is good for the USA". When I went to work there GM was concerned about selling too many cars (over 50% of the cars sold in the USA, more than Ford, Chrysler, and AMC combined), the fed was talking about a monopoly and breaking the corporation up. GM then shuffled divisions and capabilities so no one company could stand alone: Cars had to be built in Fisher Body plants with parts from Delco, Rochester, Harrison, Saginaw, Hydramatic, and DDA. Dealers had to get parts from GMPD.. Today Mary and co. have a really nice building in Detroit but major decisions are made elsewhere (SAIC) and most of the side divisions have been sold off or separated.. (Delco-Remy is owned by Borg-Warner, Guide Lamp was separated from GM then closed in 2006. Pontiac and Oldsmobile are gone (Chinese really like Buicks). Think of it as evolution in action.
    5 points
  20. Tomorrow is a car show that Kendall likes to go to. I will be taking the Red while Kendall will be taking is all original 1969 Pontiac GTO. It is really a nice car and has less then 30,000 miles. He spent the winter replacing gaskets and water pump. And then freshening up the engine compartment so it looks close to new. I spent most of the day sprucing up my car. Looks pretty good, I won't be embarrassed.
    5 points
  21. I live in Conifer, CO and I'm the proud new owner of a 1990 Reatta. Mine is white with Burgundy interior. I am SO UNBELIEVABLY EXCITED to have this car! My step-father had one just like this and I always thought it was such a cool car!This Reatta only has 31,000 miles! I'm loving it! So happy to have you all and I look forward to getting to you cool Reatta peeps! Blessings to you all! Casey
    5 points
  22. I got 265,000 miles on the Red before the engine swap and it was still a good runner. The only reason I did it was that I wasn't getting any younger and I want the Red to be my "forever" car. Kendall was willing to do it, 2seater knew how to get me a few more horses and as they say the rest is history. Now I am sitting on an original 312,000 mile Reatta except for new paint, dash, inner door panels, carpet, sunroof, engine, transmission, rack & pinion, wheels, ball joints, tie rods, struts, strut mounts, radiator, condenser, Headlight switch, CRT, IPC, Headlight Relay Harness, antenna, seats. Oops for got shift knob and shifter panel, mirror and window switches. And who could forget, relays, accumulator ball, pressure switch, pump and motor, cam sensor, Coil pack/ignition module, MAF sensor. [I think I'm done now.] Other then that, yes all original...
    5 points
  23. No indication of a problem beforehand. It just felt like missed a couple of times, and sounded like it might have spit back through the intake manifold once or twice. All the normal lights that come on when the engine dies came on but no warning messages came up. No codes in diagnostics. I coasted to the side of the road. When I tried to start it again it hit a few times and that was it. Now the engine just spins when you try to crank it. I carry a spark tester with me and there was no spark at all on any coil. I swapped in the spare ICM/coils I had in the trunk and still no spark. I have given a lot of though about what I would do if the car left me stranded. I drive on a lot of roads back in the mountains where it is easy to get stranded like I was on Sunday. The first part of my strategy is to always have a cellphone, a way to charge it, and pray that you are in an area that has service. That is the most important item you can have to get you home. I had a hell of a time getting a tow truck but at least with the cellphone I could call my wife to come and get us. I was pretty well prepared but there are some things you can't control (like waiting on the side of the road for a tow truck to show up). I carry enough tools that I can at least troubleshoot the problem so I can make an intelligent decision on what I need to do - try to fix it, call a tow truck, or both. I carry enough parts that I can fix many of the things that routinely go bad, but obviously not a bad CPS. I also carry a paper factory service manual in one of the rear compartments. Have a look here. I have plenty of bottled water, toilet paper, soap and hand cleaner, 2 lawn chairs, and a change of clothes (in case I have to stay overnight somewhere). Yes, my trunk is always full, but when you are sitting on the side of the road with a dead engine that is a good thing. 🙂
    5 points
  24. Before I took the 'vert down to Texas I gave it the "ol 2seater carpet treatment" that means a spray dye job. Turned out really well so this week it was the Red's turn. Borrowed my neighbors "Green Machine" [hand held carpet cleaner] and cleaned the carpet and floor mats. Then mixed up a batch of dye and sprayed the carpet, wiping down the vinyl as I went. Allowed to dry and turns out great. Another little project was I noticed while stopped in traffic [Brownsville Texas 80 plus temperatures] that my water temperature gauge would register 220 degrees which is high for a 185 thermostat. So this week I thought I would address that. I thought sure it would be the fan motor [so I never checked the relays] and pulled the fan [puller, radiator side] and and ran direct power to it off the battery, ran perfect. So I swapped relays around and now it works. However the puller fan stopped working so that confirmed the relay was bad. Had some extra relays in the parts bin, swapped in another and all is good.
    5 points
  25. '11 Coupe, we talking Reatta's or Regal's? 🤣
    5 points
  26. Dropped the top for the first time this year. A nice 75 degrees here in Southern Illinois today. 80 degree weather this weekend.
    5 points
  27. Reatta Reunion Charlotte Autofair 2022
    5 points
  28. done in Brownsville. I just got here and took the Red over to the local shop for a front wheel bearing and the oil pressure sending unit. They jumped right on it [using my parts] done in about 35-40 minutes and charged me $40.00 [cash]. Gave the tech a $10.00 tip and drove home. No noise and an accurate oil pressure reading. Life is good! BTW the 'vert averaged almost 29 miles to the gallon running about 70 miles per. Drove just under 1600 miles in 31 hours [including sleep]. Don't ever try sleeping in a convertible. I did for 4.5 hours and woke up because I was so uncomfortable. That wasn't enough sleep so I had to pull over for another nap. [about 1 hour].
    5 points
  29. My 90 Black Conv w/41K, ‘89 Red Coupe w/75K, and ‘90 Select 60 w/74K
    5 points
  30. I acquired my Reatta last October but haven't done much work on it. It's a restoration project- mechanically it's pretty fine and most issues are cosmetic or electrical. I've started working on the interior bits while I sort out electrical issues, and thought I'd share. I finished working on the steering wheel with freshly wrapped leather and I repainted the steering wheel badge and added a little highlighting for the airbag (to quell some worries from family- now they can READ that it has the airbag!) The badge was airbrushed with a layer of gold then translucent yellow and orange and a paint marker for the black parts. I'll be doing the seats next.
    5 points
  31. I've told you guys that Tennessee isn't prepared for snow.
    5 points
  32. I wasn't getting notified of these responses, sorry! Thanks for the advice everyone. This is actually my first project car; I have some auto tech education under my belt but not much practice since it's always been more of a hobby/interest. I'm hoping to work on it this week, so this definitely gives me some leads. Would be nice if it was just a fuse! But yes I always unlock with the key (I have a box of fobs, actually, but I'm in no hurry to mess with them haha.) And my Reatta for anyone wondering:
    5 points
  33. You know, I get really tired of automotive “journalists” with their snarky reviews of the Reatta. The car does have some shortcomings, but are easily outweighed by the advantages. The YouTube reviews, with an audio track, have much voice inflection, irritating irrelevant comment, and generally poor content. Clearly a situation where they need to boost their egos by putting someone/something else down. Pathetic.
    5 points
  34. East TN is a nice place to live if you like to get out and drive and enjoy the scenery like I do. We have the mountains with wide valleys in between like this one which is called the Sequatchie Valley. That gives me a choice of driving where it is relatively flat like this place with beautiful views of the mountains or going up in the hills and mountains where the back roads are very curvy and a lot of fun to drive on. The first picture I posted shows the mountains on one side of the valley and the last photos shows the mountains on the other side of the valley. From the little church sitting on a knoll in the middle of large pasture fields you get a panoramic view of it all. It's spectacular in the Fall when the leaves have peaked in color.
    5 points
  35. Daves89 and I had lunch today and we solved all the most pressing issues of the day so everyone else can get a good nights rest to take care of tomorrows problems in turn🙄
    5 points
  36. This photo is from a trip Kat and I took yesterday to the Sequatchie Valley, about 50 miles from our house. One of the most peaceful places I know of. Where the photo was taken is so far out and away from everything you hear no noise except for an occasional mooing of a cow in the distance. Not even the sound of a road or highway. The fall colors were at their peak there. I rarely drive on gravel roads but with no cars around I could drive about 10-15 miles per hour and enjoy the view. Another great day in my Reatta.
    5 points
  37. Met up with 2seater yesterday for lunch. We attracted a bit of attention with our two Reattas parked side by side. We ate a "Chedder's" a chain restaurant somewhat like a Perkins. We had a two hour lunch talking about Reattas, my two mechanic buddies [Kendall and Bob and how lucky I am to have them as both friends and help mates] and exchanging ideas about our cars. I had a great time.
    5 points
  38. I don't usually pass along anything that is forwarded to me but this one seemed different. It says a lot about our lives. ----------------------------------------- The Importance of Time A young man learns what's most important in life from the guy next door. It had been some time since Jack had seen the old man. College, girls, career, and life itself got in the way. In fact, Jack moved clear across the country in pursuit of his dreams. There, in the rush of his busy life, Jack had little time to think about the past and often no time to spend with his wife and son. He was working on his future, and nothing could stop him. Over the phone, his mother told him, "Mr.. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday." Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days. "Jack, did you hear me?" "Oh sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It's been so long since I thought of him. I'm sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago," Jack said. "Well, he didn't forget you. Every time I saw him he'd ask how you were doing. He'd reminisce about the many days you spent over 'his side of the fence' as he put it," Mom told him. "I loved that old house he lived in," Jack said. "You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man's influence in your life," she said. "He's the one who taught me carpentry," he said. "I wouldn't be in this business if it weren't for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important...Mom, I'll be there for the funeral," Jack said. As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser's funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away. The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time. Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time. The house was exactly as he remembered. Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture....Jack stopped suddenly. "What's wrong, Jack?" his Mom asked. "The box is gone," he said. "What box?" Mom asked. "There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he'd ever tell me was 'the thing I value most, '" Jack said. It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it. "Now I'll never know what was so valuable to him," Jack said. "I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom." It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died. Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. "Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days," the note read. Early the next day Jack retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention. "Mr. Harold Belser" it read. Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package There inside was the gold box and an envelope. Jack's hands shook as he read the note inside. "Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It's the thing I valued most in my life." A small key was taped to the letter. His heart racing, as tears filling his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch. Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved: "Jack, Thanks for your time! -Harold Belser." "The thing he valued most...was...my time." Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days. "Why?" Janet, his assistant asked. "I need some time to spend with my son," he said. "Oh, by the way, Janet...thanks for your time!" "Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away," Think about this. You may not realize it, but it's 100% true. 1. At least 2 people in this world love you so much they would die for you. 2. At least 15 people in this world love you in some way. 3. A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don't like you. 4. Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep. 5. You mean the world to someone. 6. If not for you, someone may not be living. 7. You are special and unique. 8. When you think you have no chance of getting what you want, you probably won't get it, but if you trust God to do what's best, and wait on His time, sooner or later, you will get it or something better. 9. When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good can still come from it. 10. When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a look: you most likely turned your back on the world. 11. Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks. 12. Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know and you'll both be happy. 13. If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great. Send this letter to all the people you care about, if you do so, you will certainly make someone's day.
    4 points
  39. The Reatta has a diagnostic program in the CRT. If you look at the blue bar on the top of the page you will see "Diagnostics". This section of the site will explain how to go into the great diagnostics and get the codes. Then a different section of the page will tell you what each code means. I am betting you are getting a Eo41 is the cam sensor. This is not a real concern at this time as the car defaults to factory setting. Usually there are two things that usually fail, the ignition module/coils or the crankshaft sensor. I even had a situation where my crankshaft sensor came loose in the bracket so it would start and run great and then would not start for a time and then magically start and run perfect. Unless it's fual and your mechanic should do a fuel system test with a fuel pressure gauge. There are fuel system information in the "How to" section also on the top of the page.
    4 points
  40. 4 points
  41. First day of spring. We wanted to take a spin in the Reatta convertible. Ha! Dead battery. It got jumped and was driven ten feet out of the garage. Battery still dead but was very happy to have the new toy out to play. Your milage mat vary.
    4 points
  42. Just got back from a 270 mile round trip running appointments. Not a single issue no bucking or anything. I think I will chalk this up to bad gas as all the symptoms/issues slowly went away.
    4 points
  43. Merry Christmas to all! If you didn't get the gifts you expected here's why. 🙂
    4 points
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