Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/27/2023 in all areas

  1. Dave- I pick the car up this afternoon and I'll post the part number.
    2 points
  2. I know it looks different. I think it looked better before on my desktop but I'm getting use to it. I think it works much better now on my cellphone and iPad than it did before the update.
    2 points
  3. Do they have one in a different color that you could simply paint, or do just not have any? Have you looked into auto salvage yards around the country? Car-Part.com--Used Auto Parts Market
    2 points
  4. Could you post the part number? I would like to order one for my inventory. Cheaper then buying a column at the local U Pick.
    2 points
  5. Thanks, because the picture of the helps one in Ronnie's post id the wrong one.
    1 point
  6. I had to go back and reread this thread. I thought there was a comment that it could be heard, occasionally when free revving it, but as of now, it is only under some load. One way to see if the engine is hearing knock, or some other noise that might retard timing, drive the car in diagnostic mode and watch ED17, Knock counts. It is normal for some knock counts to register just from startup noise, so don't worry about the number that may appear there, this is normal. The thing to look for; is the number increasing during normal driving, specifically when you hear the sound, or the engine seems to struggle. Has the fuel pressure and delivery been verified? I know we headed off in the direction of ignition, but I believe you mechanic questioned fuel delivery way back in the beginning.
    1 point
  7. Thanks for responses guys, this is exactly what the problem is. Fortunately I had the car at a repair shop for maintenance when it broke. They took the steering column apart and found it. Ordered the $13 part from a Chevrolet parts warehouse and said it might have 2 hours of labor in it. I can't believe these parts are still in stock. Thanks to everyone here.
    1 point
  8. Alright, finally managed to crawl just above the freezing point today. The bracket I picked up was correct, but had absolutely no hardware, and the holes the coil screws go into were untapped, so I found some hardware that would work (stainless flat heads just barely worked) and tapped it with a metric tap at work. Went in and checked the plugs against the proper firing order. I'm more than a little confused how this weird mixup happened, but I labeled the plugs with the correct coil numbers. Threw on the Delco ICM and coils, trimmed the three coil screws closest to the engine because there was no hole on the engine mount for them, and she fired right up. The junkyard parts are good, at least. Went for a drive through town.... And the problem's still there. She sounds growly at around 1700 RPM and up still. I don't think it's a hole in the exhaust, because I should hear that even when idling. I'm gonna stop by my mechanic, at the very least he might be able to spot something under the hood (no helpers to rev the engine for me sadly, and I don't want to grab a brick).
    1 point
  9. You are absolutely right, the ICM needs the ground but I have often questioned if the big cast mounting bracket added or removed heat from the ICM🙃 What I was ruminating about was the coilpack itself, which does not have a grounding requirement in the electrical sense, and maybe I have muddied the water. Not my intention. The ICM has several functions in addition to initiating spark, but the coil(s) have a single purpose, and it does not care which direction it is oriented as long as the connections are in the proper order.
    1 point
  10. I'll check the plug wires themselves (I had labeled them according to the coil numbers), but when I install the Delco unit, I'll set it up how it should be. It had always ran on all cylinders, though. Edit: After looking at pictures of the Magnavox-style ICM, it seems there's spades that get hooked up to the coils and then sandwiched between the two, so I suppose it's possible it was wired correctly, and simply installed upside down. I could take a look at it later, but this seems like the most likely cause.
    1 point
  11. As you can see in your photo, the wire numbers are stamped next to where the plug wire connects. It appears your coil pack has been installed on the ICM 180 degrees from what it should be making number 6-3 nearest to the harness connector. I didn't know that was possible but apparently it is. If you reverse the coil pack numbers 6-3 will be on the opposite end from the harness connector as they should be. Below is a photo of my old Magnavox ignition with the coil pack installed properly. Numbers 6-3 should be on the opposite end from the from the harness connector on the Delco coils also.
    1 point
  12. The website works well for me on my laptop and iPhone. I suspect the "12" for all is well comes from the instructions for the 1991, the Bosch system. It is listed under the 1991 ABS instructions on this website as the last number in the string and there are no more codes. I didn't see any "all clear" type of flashing on the 88-90 instructions so I looked in my FSM and it states: if the light comes on for four seconds and then stays off, there are no codes stored.
    1 point
  13. Have you checked to see if you are getting any codes? I've had problems with poor performance and it was the ICM. I cut and pasted a reply from a previous post I made some months ago. The MAF was replaced (due to code (E034) and then I got a code for the Cam Sensor (E041). Replaced both which were of no help. I then got a code for the Ignition System (E042) and after checking and finding that two cylinders were not getting spark, I then replaced the Ignition coil and ignition control module. The car now runs great (at least for the 25-30 miles that I've driven since). Turns out, I suspect, that the ICM was probably the original culprit all along in spite of the E034 and E041 codes. Funny thing is that the codes popped up one at a time and not all at once. Had the E042 code shown up first, a replacement ICM and coil pack may have cured the poor performance right off the bat. As it is, I spent way too much on trouble shooting, especially with the replacement MAF (and also the catalytic converter) before checking the ignition coils. I'd suggest that anyone encountering extremely poor performance start off by testing the ignition coil and ICM.
    1 point
  14. Fuel problems usually don't cause a "tinny" sound. Here is a link to testing the fuel pump. It covers about everything your mechanic will need to know about fuel pump performance. Fuel Pressure Testing If the battery and alternator are good enough to start the engine, they won't cause a performance problem once it is running. With the relatively low mileage of your car, the cat isn't likely to be the problem. Poor performance (stumbling) when the engine is under a load is more likely to be a problem with the ignition system. Bad spark plugs/wires or the Ignition control module (ICM) most often the cause.
    1 point
  15. It's hard to say what the ticking might be without hearing it. I doubt it is a timing chain at only 107k on it. I would take the belt off and see if the ticking noise goes away. That will tell you if it's something external to the engine, alternator, belt, pulley, etc. causing the tick.
    1 point
  16. I don't know how in depth the replacement is intended to be, but they did move some components around under the hood, primarily the location of the A/C components, with the accumulator location being the most obvious. As far as I know, the sheet metal, mounts and accessory locations won't interfere with keeping the 1991 configuration. The suspension is a bit different, primarily the sway bar mounting, on the 88-89 vs the 90-91. I do not know the details of the 91 wiring harness under the hood but the 90 is definitely different than the 88-89. Essentially the functions are the same, but the routing and locations may be somewhat different.
    1 point
  17. The front suspension is basically the same for all Reatta years except that the 1991 has 16" wheels instead of 15" for previous years. The brake system was not updated for 1991, just changed over previous years (Teves vs. Bosch). The '91 Reatta engine is a L27 vs. previous years LN3. Most likely the 88-93 Riviera front suspension is equal, too. My '91 Reatta is also white with flame red interior. Yours has white belt molding vs. mine has black.
    1 point
  18. You might check with your local auto parts store, they may loan you a gauge.
    1 point
  19. I just have a good fuel pressure tester from the pre-Kmart Sears. You connect it to the rail shrader valve. Should be 35-40 psi at Idle. Might also check the fuel relief valve for gas in the vacuum line, they fail also.
    1 point
  20. The rpm signal comes from the ICM. Did the engine continue to run without the rpm display? The voltage displayed is normal with the engine running. By and large, the indicators are designed to be at approximately the middle of the range if everything is normal. The fuel level is of course variable. If oil pressure is normal with a proper sender, it rarely deviates one bar higher or lower than center, no matter the rpm or temperature. The pressures mentioned in the above post are for oil pressure, not fuel pressure as I had posted. Any possibility of mouse chewed wiring? Still need a fuel pressure gauge to establish if the pump is at fault or something else. At least it runs, which is a positive.
    1 point
  21. Just a little food for thought. I don't know if the following applies to a '91 model but it does to my '88 model. IF the ECM and fuel pump relay are working properly you should be able to unplug the oil pressure sensor/switch and the engine will start and run without problems. I have done it before to prove it. Here is what should happen for the car to start and run normally from a fuel pressure point of view... -When you turn the key to the run position the ECM should pick up the fuel pump relay for a few seconds to prime the system - then drop it out. This should happen each time your turn the key off and then to the run position. -Once the engine starts, the ECM gets a signal from the crankshaft position sensor that the engine is turning and it will pick up the fuel pump relay and keep it latched in to power the fuel pump as long as the engine is running. (blue circuit below) Now, here is where the oil pressure sensor/switch comes in... -As long as the engine has oil pressure the contacts in the oil pressure sensor bypass the fuel pump relay and power the fuel pump (yellow circuit) even if the relay is bad. If any of this is suspect, applying 12 volts to the prime connector will run the fuel pump so you can test the pressure. You can even start the car if the pump is capable of building adequate pressure.
    1 point
  22. LN3 spec is 40 psi at 1800. L27 is 60psi. "able to crank idled then sputtered " sure sounds like the 2 second prime shot is working but then the oil pressure switch is supposed to take over. Can monitor fuel pump voltage at prime connector. GM oil pressure senders are notorious for failing just make sure you get one for an L27 and not an LN3.
    1 point
  23. Even though they are combined in the master cylinder as a unit, you can think of the ABS (Antilock Brake System) and the power brakes as two separate systems. 1. Power Brakes The red warning light staying on all the time tells you that there is a problem with the pressure in the power brakes system. This is a dangerous situation and the car isn't safe to drive. If you see the red warning light flash momentarily when you tap the brakes it is usually caused by a bad accumulator. The car can still be driven with caution but the problem should be fixed as soon as possible. 2. ABS The yellow ABS light tells you there is a problem with the ABS. When anything in the ABS system goes wrong, even one wheel sensor, the ABS light will come on and the entire ABS will be disabled until the problem is fixed. The power brake part of the system will still function normally and you can still drive the care safely as long as the red warning light isn't on. You just won't have the anti-lock feature of the Teves brake system. The ABS makes the Reatta stop much quicker in a panic situation without sliding the wheels. It has saved my butt several times. Something that should be noted is anytime the red warning light is on the yellow ABS warning light will come on within a few seconds. That doesn't always mean the ABS system has a problem. The problem that is causing the red warning light to be on should be corrected first before trying to get the yellow ABS light to go out.
    1 point
  24. It was exactly the same size and fit like the original.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...